Tag: car subwoofer

Car Audio Equipment Ideal for Hip-Hop/Rap Music

Ever wonder as to whether or not it makes a difference as to what type of sound system you have in your vehicle that truly fits with the type of music you listen to? Well the truth is that yes, there is quite a significance in sound quality dependent upon pairing up the right equipment to fit into what style of music you prefer to listen to.

Kicker C104 10" Subwoofer

Kicker C104 10" Subwoofer

The best car speakers for Hip Hop music should be designated to make your songs sound great. Hip Hop sounds best on a system that has the ability to create good bass notes and strong midrange sound. The bass notes are vital to make sure the beat is clear through the song. The midrange notes will make the lyrics and backup crisp and powerful.

Earthquake Sound TNT-12S 12" Subwoofer

Earthquake Sound TNT-12S 12" Subwoofer

The best speakers for bass are clearly subwoofers or “subs.” 10 inch or 12 inch subs will hit the bass notes that are too low for standard speakers. When you turn up the bass in a car without subs the music becomes distorted and doesn’t sound right. Add the extra bass of a subwoofer, and it sounds accurate to its production. That’s the extra power of the larger speakers coming in to give the bass an extra hit.

JL Audio TR600-CXi 6" Speakers

JL Audio TR600-CXi 6" Speakers

For midrange, a good set of 6 inch speakers will fill out the system very nicely. This will combine with the subs giving your favorite songs the quality sound you deserve. 6 by 9 speakers are a little more expensive, but they are even niftier than 6 inch speakers and have a little better range. If you can fit it in your budget, they are a great choice.

Pioneer TS-A6994R 6" x 9" Speakers

Pioneer TS-A6994R 6" x 9" Speakers

With these 2 basic components, you’ll be sure to have a great sounding car stereo. If it’s in your budget you might even consider adding a basic set of tweeters, but they aren’t as important because high notes aren’t as common in Hip Hop as they are in other types of music.

Make sure you check out all of our car audio equipment here at Sonic Electronix, and make sure you find the right system that will truly bring out the definition of your choice in music while you are on the road.

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You’ve got your subwoofer, now what about the box?

There are three different types of subwoofer boxes that you should be looking to consider, depending on what type of subwoofer you get.

Sealed Subwoofer Enclosure

Sealed Subwoofer Enclosure

The sealed subwoofer enclosure is described by great transient response, excellent low frequency power handling, and a smaller box size. When a speaker is attached in a box, the air in the box turns to shape a spiral. Yet, sealed systems incline to hurt from complex limit points and lower sensitivity than the other low rate systems. They are usually the subwoofer of choice due to their great response.

Ported Subwoofer Enclosures

Ported Subwoofer Enclosures

ported enclosure system contains of a driver fixed on a side of a box that has an open area that lets the air in and out of the box. The port is there to tune the closed off space so that the rear wave of the speaker boosts the front wave of the speaker. This tends to results in a subwoofer with higher effectiveness. At lower frequencies, the opening adds greatly to the output of the system. The box design itself is made to perform as a filter to cutting off lower frequencies.

 

Bandpass Subwoofer Boxes

Bandpass Subwoofer Boxes

Bandpass boxes will produce more bass than either of the previous boxes mentioned, but over a thinner range of frequency. Working as a filter, the box blocks lower and higher frequencies, and in most cases a crossover is not needed.  These boxes are typically big and provide very accurate volumes.  Bandpass boxes also usually cover distortion which at times leads to damaged subs. Bandpass enclosures are very efficient in the band of frequencies that they are tuned to or pass.

Make sure to check out all the subwoofer boxes we have right here at SonicElectronix.com

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Want to hook up your own subwoofer?

Lately I’ve been doing a lot of research on car audio (being that I am one of the newest team members here at Sonic Electronix) and even though I highly recommend you get this done by a trained professional, there is always an opportunity to learn something new and try it yourself. Stereo systems are at least as simple as most other single accessory electrical systems, but they are still electrical systems. Physically wiring the system is the easiest part of installation. The rest of it is knowing what you’re working with and figuring out what to connect to what and in what way. But once you know what all those numbers and ratings on the amps and speakers mean, the process pretty much explains itself.

First and foremost you need to determine your amplifier’s minimum stable impedance  in ohms of resistance. You’ll typically find the stable impedance rating between 1 ohm for a powerful amp and 5 to 10 ohms for a less powerful one. The lower the amp’s stable ohm rating, the more power it can transmit through a single channel without frying. For this blog, I’m going to explain this if I were using an amplifier with a 2-ohm minimum staple impedance.

Now go ahead and check your subwoofer’s ohms of impedance. This works the same way as the amp does; a massive, powerful subwoofer has large coil windings that provide little resistance to power flow and a smaller speaker provides more resistance. This will determine whether you need to wire the subs in parallel or in series. Compare your amplifier’s ohm rating to the speakers. If the speaker ohm reading is lower than the amp’s, then connecting that single speaker directly to the amp output will fry your amp. You’ll need another speaker and you’ll need to connect the speakers in a series circuit instead of a parallel circuit.

Connect a parallel circuit in just the way you’d think ( positive to positive and negative to negative). As long as none of the speakers in your system have a lower ohm rating than the amp, then you’ll want to connect them directly to the amp terminals. This will give you the best chance at nailing down the ground pounding power you are looking for.

Connect the first part a series circuit by wiring the positive lead of one speaker to the positive terminal on your amp. Connect the negative terminal on that speaker to the positive terminal on the next in your series. If you only need two speakers to meet your amp’s minimum impedance, then connect the negative terminal on the second speaker to the negative terminal on your amp.

Wire as many speakers into the series as you need to meet your amp’s minimum amp impedance. Connect them all positive to negative with the positive and negative terminals on the speakers on the ends of your series connected to the appropriate terminals on your amp.

Now do remember that every car is different, so if you have any questions feel free to contact us here and Sonic Electronix and we’d love to help you out. Of course it’s going to be a little intimidating, but please make sure that you never work on your cars electrical system unless you are absolutely comfortable with it.

Make sure to check out all of our subwoofers here at Sonic Electronix, our Subwoofer Olympics Event, and look into starting your next project now!

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Why Everyone Should Own A Subwoofer

Who Needs Bass?

Focal BUS 25

Focal BUS 25 10" Powered Subwoofer Enclosure

Picture this: You’re driving along listening to your music.  You pull up next to a 16 year old kid at a red light who has his subwoofers blaring so loud that your ears start to bleed.  You think to yourself, “How does that make music enjoyable?” Fact of the matter is that some people want bass so loud that you have to replace your windshield after every listening session.  At the same time, some people just want bass that will compliment their music in order to achieve the full spectrum of musical frequencies. No matter what your preference, there is a subwoofer for everyone.  Without a subwoofer, you could be missing out on listening to your music how it was intended to be heard.

Kicker PECVR12

Kicker PECVR12 Single 12" Amplified, Loaded Enclosure

Not everyone needs two 18″ subwoofers that will rattle your brain into next Tuesday.  While this application is great for genres of music such as hip-hop or dubstep, there are many other genres of music that do not require as much bass.  Easy-listening, jazz, classic rock, or blues just to name a few.  One could argue that bass is even more essential in these genres.  These soft musical genres have low-end bass frequencies that can be unheard without the utilization of a subwoofer.   Even if you have a vehicle with limited space, you can find a subwoofer solution that is right for you.  Amplified, loaded subwoofer enclosures are an all-in-one way of adding bass to any vehicle.  They include integrated amplifiers so installation is minimal.  These are ideal for leased or rented vehicles which you hesitate to tamper with.  If you own a truck, there are plenty of shallow-mount subwoofers and pre-loaded enclosures that can conveniently fit under the back seats.  All of these different options make it hard to argue against a bass filled system.

Whether you’re looking to put yourself in a bass coma or trying to recreate studio quality sound, there is always a way to get bass in your vehicle.  Being able to properly reproduce low frequencies will give your music a 3d-like tone.  Chances are you spend a good amount of time in your car.  So why not invest in some comfort food for your ears?  You don’t have to be a punk kid like me to appreciate large quantities of bass either!  We have a huge selection to choose from. Check it out!

 

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Multi-Channel & Mono-Channel Differences

If your car audio sound system is not meeting your expectations then maybe your specifications are to blame.  When examining mono and multi-channel amplifiers, there a few specifications that you should pay closer attention to than others.

Multi-Channel Amplifiers

Pioneer GMD9500F

Pioneer GMD9500F 4-Channel Amplifier

2, 3, 4, 5 or more channel amplifiers are usually Class A/B.  The class is determined by the configuration of the circuitry.  Class A/B circuitry leans towards being more inefficient but provides higher sound quality.  This makes them ideal for mid to high frequencies but are sometimes used for subwoofers as well.  They will also run at much cooler temperatures considering the lower wattage applications they are required to be operated in.  If you are considering purchasing a multi-channel amplifier, then the following specifications should be kept in mind to sway your decision:

 

  • Signal-to-Noise Ratio: This figure refers to the strength of the signal vs. the level of back ground noise.  A high value will indicate a lower background noise and as a result, a better signal.
  • THD (Total Harmonic Distortion): This is the measurement of the harmonic distortion that is present.  It can be explained as the change in the signal as it is being amplified and exactly how much it is changed.  A lower value is desirable and a THD value of less than .10% is inaudible.
  • Channel Separation:  Sometimes referred to as “cross talk” this value indicates the level of interference between channels.  This value is measured in decibels and the higher the value, the greater and more effective the channel separation will be.

Mono-Channel Amplifiers

Rockford Fosgate PBR300X1

Rockford Fosgate PBR300X1 Monoblock Amplifier

Mono-Channel Amplifiers usually are Class D.  These amplifiers are going to be able to obtain lower ohm loads and higher output which makes them ideal for subwoofers. They are more efficient then their class A/B counterparts. In recent years, monoblock amplifiers have become more efficient and with smaller chassis. Features such as signal-to-noise ratio and THD will often be negatively effected. However, these specifications are not as important as others in regards to mono-channel amps. When examining mono amplifiers there a few different specs you should pay a bit more attention to:

 

  • Damping Factor: Having a high damping factor means there is a high ratio between the nominal load impedance (typically 8W ) and the source impedance of the amplifier.  It is said that the higher this value is, the more cone control is present which results in a better system response and more accurate bass.
  •  Pre-Amp Outputs: Most Mono amps have pre-amp outputs to daisy chain multiple amplifiers together without splitting the pre-outs from your head-unit.
  • Subsonic Filter:Only on mono amplifiers, this filter allows you to block frequencies that are not able to be reproduced by your subwoofer.  This filter is usally variable between 15-50 Hz.

Using an amplifier in the wrong application is bad, mkay.

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