Tag: subwoofer enclosures

You’ve got your subwoofer, now what about the box?

There are three different types of subwoofer boxes that you should be looking to consider, depending on what type of subwoofer you get.

Sealed Subwoofer Enclosure

Sealed Subwoofer Enclosure

The sealed subwoofer enclosure is described by great transient response, excellent low frequency power handling, and a smaller box size. When a speaker is attached in a box, the air in the box turns to shape a spiral. Yet, sealed systems incline to hurt from complex limit points and lower sensitivity than the other low rate systems. They are usually the subwoofer of choice due to their great response.

Ported Subwoofer Enclosures

Ported Subwoofer Enclosures

ported enclosure system contains of a driver fixed on a side of a box that has an open area that lets the air in and out of the box. The port is there to tune the closed off space so that the rear wave of the speaker boosts the front wave of the speaker. This tends to results in a subwoofer with higher effectiveness. At lower frequencies, the opening adds greatly to the output of the system. The box design itself is made to perform as a filter to cutting off lower frequencies.

 

Bandpass Subwoofer Boxes

Bandpass Subwoofer Boxes

Bandpass boxes will produce more bass than either of the previous boxes mentioned, but over a thinner range of frequency. Working as a filter, the box blocks lower and higher frequencies, and in most cases a crossover is not needed.  These boxes are typically big and provide very accurate volumes.  Bandpass boxes also usually cover distortion which at times leads to damaged subs. Bandpass enclosures are very efficient in the band of frequencies that they are tuned to or pass.

Make sure to check out all the subwoofer boxes we have right here at SonicElectronix.com

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Things to Look For When Buying a New Subwoofer

Kicker Comp Enclosure

Anyone is familiar with how music sounds in their own cars.  We’re used to it, and quite frankly it’s usually not good enough to meet any of our standards.  We want volume; we want to feel our music.  Luckily, we’re not alone in this feeling.  After hearing a fully tuned audio system, hearing your factory speakers just may not be strong enough to satisfy a craving that we’re all too familiar with.  That craving in question, is the yearning for bass.

So you’ve taken a spot in your vehicle and reserved it for your future subwoofer box and amplifier.  Now it’s time for you to decide on which specific products are going to go into your car.  This can be a mind-boggling decision, as there are so many options for awesome bass solutions in any car!

The first decision to make is how much bass are you looking for?  Are you the type who wants to compliment their audio system with a punchy style bass, or a booming bass that can shake the walls of your entire block?  Audio systems that can provide a punchy style bass are usually more affordable and require a smaller amplifier, which is why these are considered more of an “entry-level” system.  A great way to pursue this style of bass is with a loaded subwoofer enclosure like the Kicker DC122.

Let’s say you were more interested in the block shaking bass that can rattle picture frames off of the wall.  These types of systems can usually require larger amounts of amplification, which can draw a lot of energy from your car audio systems, so be prepared to equip your vehicle with an extra Power Cell or two, and maybe even a beefed up alternator.  High-powered subwoofer systems are loud, and can have you truly feeling your bass and music the way you may be looking for.  Subwoofers that can handle 1000 watts of continuous power are usually considered to be manufactured with Sound Pressure Level (SPL) in mind.  Take your time choosing the subwoofer that will be outputting bass in your vehicle, as each woofer is geared towards its own audience.

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