Tag: synthesizer

Roland’s Lucina AX-09: Last Chance to Save $100!

That’s right! Right now, Roland is offering $100 cash back on the Lucina AX-09 and the Lucina AX-09B! But not for much longer…

We at Sonic Electronix consistently strive to give the best prices to our customers, and with the addition of this special manufacturer promotion, there’s never been a better time to pick up one of these fantastic Roland synthesizers.

Available in both white and black, the Lucina sets keyboard players free of the restrictions of keyboard stands and AC adapters. The Lucina is essentially a “keytar.” It’s designed for one hand to play the keys and the other to work the modulation bar, pitch bend touch strip, D-Beam controller or anything else they so desire.

With its 37 velocity-sensitive keys, 150 high-quality sounds, built-in USB audio player and its battery-powered functionality, it’s no wonder that professional keyboard players who perform with stars like Usher, Ke$ha, Kanye West and Lady Gaga use and love the Lucina AX-09.
Roland also has a series of lesson videos & mp3 backing tracks to help get you performing at your full potential.

If you’re thinking of integrating video into your performances, you’re in luck! Both Lucina AX-09 models come with V-Link MIDI outputs; simply hook up a standard 5-pin MIDI cable from your Lucina into a compatible video mixer or presenter unit, and you’re ready to go! The more elaborate details of that process are well outside the scope of this blog, but the possibility is there. What you do with it, dear readers, is up to you. Whatever you do though, you should do it sooner rather than later, because the aforementioned manufacturer promotion ends after March 31st, 2012!

Don’t forget to pick up the LUCINA BAG,
the only carrying bag specifically designed for your new Lucina synthesizer!

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Roland Pro Audio Gear – Coming Soon to Sonic Electronix!

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Roland is about to celebrate its 40th anniversary and Sonic Electronix couldn’t be happier for them! To help celebrate, we will soon be carrying a comprehensive line of Roland, Boss and Cakewalk pro audio gear. Roland was founded by Mr. Ikutaro Kakehashi in Osaka, Japan in April of 1972. Today, Roland has factories in the U.S., Italy, Japan and Taiwan. For any out there who might have just recently emerged from under a rock, Roland is one of the most ubiquitous and reputable names in professional audio equipment. From instruments like synthesizers, electronic drum sets and dance/DJ gear to amplifiers, guitar pedals and recording products, Roland will no doubt continue to expand its catalog throughout the professional audio world.

Where It All Began

Roland’s first product was the Roland Rhythm 77 (TR-77), a drum machine housed in a flat wooden case that had a stand for holding scorebooks. It was designed for rhythm accompaniment to organs, pianos, synths and such. It was one of a trio of drum machines (TR-33 & TR-55) with slightly different features between them. In 2011, Roland has unveiled products such as the BC-2 Combo Drive guitar pedal, a complete DAW (Digital Audio Workstation) known as Sonar X1, and the globally unique SPD-SX sampling pad among several others. Truly, each of these products could warrant a blog of their own, and maybe we’ll see one or some of those here someday as Sonic Electronix continues to grow.

Where It’s Going

We at Sonic Electronix are clearly taking our expansion into the professional audio realm very seriously with the addition of the Roland product line. We’re tirelessly working to get these products up and available on our site so that you can take advantage of Sonic’s great deals and integrate the Roland name into your life. Eleanor Roosevelt once said, “Life is what you make it.” With nary a shred of doubt, I think just about anyone reading this would agree that music can make life pretty spectacular. Between your enthusiasm for music and the legendary quality of the Roland name, the possibilities are infinite. Keep your eyes and ears open for more news on this topic, as we will soon be shouting it from the rooftops… and blogging about it from our cubicles, of course.

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Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) 101

What is MIDI?

For starters, for anyone who isn’t yet “in the know,” MIDI is NOT music.

I know, I know; shocking, right? It is not a digital audio codec like MP3, AAC, FLAC, etc. No actual sound ever passes through MIDI cables, either. There are .mid files, yes, but they’re made up of data that when run through the proper software, one can indeed hear music and/or musical sounds. In fact, anyone who’s ever played Rock Band or Guitar Hero has a bit of experience with MIDI, whether they realize it or not. Let me simplify a bit and say that MIDI is a digital communications language.

What is it used for?

MIDI is a set of instructions that one uses to tell instruments and software what to do. The acronym “MIDI,” stands for “Musical Instrument Digital Interface.” However, MIDI can also be used to control lighting equipment and even animatronics and robotics. As you can most likely guess after reading that, MIDI can do far more than simply tell instruments what notes to play when. Through MIDI, users can turn volume up or down, open filter controls and pan around the stereo spectrum among many other things. Like most any other sync protocol, MIDI is transmitted through a Master/Slave relationship. Master devices ONLY transmit data. Slave devices ONLY receive it. What are some examples of said devices, you ask?

Why is it important? Who uses MIDI?

Master devices are essentially tangible things: keyboards/synthesizers like the Akai Pro LPK25, electronic drum pads and DJ software controllers like the ION Discover DJ (ICUE3) as well as the various buttons, sliders and knobs on the devices themselves. DJs and musicians alike use devices like that to control software on their computers, manipulating the music (like more traditional DJs do when they “scratch” records) and thus achieving their own unique sound. Slave devices can be tangible too, like in the case of daisy chaining keyboards together, but they can also be plug-ins and software instruments like Logic’s EXS24.

What are software instruments and plug-ins? Well, that’s a whole other blog right there (maybe you’ll see that one sometime in the near future!) Anyway, through a little customization, users can assign software functions to knobs to control things like flangers, echoes, etc. so they can affect the music with a vast variety of special effects. Actually, if you’re thinking about getting into DJing, now would be a great time since we’re currently offering 15% off all DJ controllers, and a lot of them come packaged with reputable software like Traktor LE, Serato or Ableton Live to get you started.

In conclusion, I hope you’ve enjoyed this little introduction to MIDI, and I encourage anyone reading this to ask any questions you might have. Believe it or not, we’re all actual people here at Sonic Electronix, and we do pay attention to what our customers and fans have to say. Thanks for reading!

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